Gelli and Slime Baff – review

Wow – so I get sent things to review every now and then, but this is easily the best thing ever that I’ve been sent.

Zimpli Kids have two new products – Gelli Baff and Slime Baff – to entertain kids at bath time. Gelli Baff turns the water into tiny jelly particles, before you use their special salt and rinse it happily down the plug. Slime Baff turns the bath water into gunge. Then, theoretically, you just add more water to disperse – but we found scrubbing the slippery bottom of the bath with soap got rid of the last bits of goo.

So, I popped Stevie in the bath (or baff?) on Monday afternoon, armed with a bag of pink ‘Gelli’ powder. I wasn’t really expecting a lot, to be honest, but she loved it. She thought the jelly was amazing to squeeze and squish between her hands, she liked filling up her buckets and cups with it and watching it go ‘splat’ and she was also fond of coating Mummy’s knees in the stuff. We spent an entire hour in the tub with this product. It didn’t hurt her skin, it stayed jelly-like all the way through, and even I enjoyed playing with it. The colour was a very consistent pink (her favourite) and it smelled lovely. Stevie was devastated when we had to get out, and immediately asked for “more jelly.” RESULT!

Then, last night, we popped four kids in the Slime. My bath was a bit more crowded, but this also went down a treat!

The slime took a little bit longer to turn to the correct consistency, and I thought we’d have a failure, but once it got there, they were sold. Riley is the same age as Stevie, 2, whereas Jordan is almost 6 and Maggi is 8. I definitely found that the older kids preferred the slimeyness to the younger ones – Stevie spent most of the time massaging slime into Maggi’s back, and Riley just did her own thing in the tub. Maggi wanted to take slime home, and Jordan was insistent she enjoyed the slime “the most out of everyone!”

There was slight confusion, as I said, when trying to dissolve the slime. It didn’t want to dissolve!

I waited until the kids got out before I tried again, with hot water this time, and it did help – and the soap on the bottom of the bath to get rid of the scum worked. I’d recommend the leaflet maybe include that info (as it does the salt info in the Gelli leaflet).

Gelli and Slime Baff will be available at Toys ‘R’ Us in South Africa in about 2 weeks – just in time for Santa! All 3 of us mums who tried the product said we’ll be popping some in stockings for Christmas. It’s great sensory play for kids, it’s clean and easy to get rid of, they feel like they’re making a mess even when they’re not (it’s stain-free) – what’s not to love?! Something that can keep my very busy daughter happy in one place for a whole hour is good by me. Product definitely approved.

ZimpliKids.com

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Pregnancy Vitamins

So, here’s something that may shock you: with my last pregnancy, I didn’t take any all-inclusive pregnancy vitamin. I know, it’s shocking, isn’t it? I took a basic folic acid supplement (also known as vitamin B9) and, controversially, a vitamin D supplement. My midwife, who I loved, told me not to worry about taking any more – so I didn’t.

But this time, it’s been different all round. First off, my GP has been worried about the effects of excess vitamin D on a foetus, and since your general prenatal supplement contains vitamin D, she advised me to skip it. Folic acid, meanwhile, is one of the top ingredients in most prenatal supplements, so there was no worry about my lacking in that (although my body may have thought so – in the first trimester I found myself craving more citrus fruits and leafy greens than usual, which are high in natural vitamin B9).

When I saw a gynae for my 20-week check and scan, he advised taking a general inclusive prenatal vitamin. I started out taking the most popular brand, but I was invited to try Chela Preg Trimester 1,2,3.

Chela Preg is a newer supplement, and instead of being a general, all round kind of tablet, it separates into the 3 different trimesters. Now, because I heard of it late, I didn’t start taking it until 27 weeks, and therefore had only a week of the 2nd trimester pack. So I’m not going to even bother giving an opinion on it. Im not qualified!

However, I am now 2 weeks into trustee 3 of Chela Preg. So far, I’m liking it. Now, I’m no scientist, so I can’t claim that slightly less reflux is down to the different medication, or if it’s just a moving baby. If you believe in coincidence, then maybe it’s just that… or maybe not.

There are 4 tablets to take a day in trimester 3. This is, admittedly, a slight struggle for me – I had to have the copper loop inserted at 12 weeks pregnant, as I couldn’t handle taking the mini-pill at the same time every day – so these were a bit of a nightmare to get used to! I found placing them next to the glass cupboard helped, so that I’d see them getting my morning juice, and in the evenings getting my dinner drink. So far so good!

In the third trimester pack, the idea is that the vitamins and nutrients are formulated to help with excessive growth of the foetus. This means more iron (the chelated form, so less constipation and reflux are the aims of the game, here), more calcium for strong bones, and more zinc and vitamins C and E to help reduce the chance of complications in the rest of the pregnancy and during birth.

So far, sounds so great, right? I just liked the idea of the tablets being formulated specifically (I’m a nerd like that, sometimes) and I honestly didn’t know if I’d feel any different after changing them over. And, of course, we’ll probably (hopefully?) never know if any one brand of vitamin does any harm, or has any benefits, more than the other. However – I can say I’ve felt pretty good since using it (who knows if that’s a placebo effect?) AND it’s cheaper than the leading brands – and I mean, MUCH cheaper – the leading brand of prenatal supplements costs r208 per 30-day pack. Chela Preg Trimester 123 costs r600 for the entire 9 months or so of pregnancy. It’s a no-brainer, for cost effectiveness if nothing else.

For a more official review of this product, go to News24.

Weaning Sense

So this week I was invited to the launch of a new book, Weaning Sense.

The majority of South African readers will be familiar with the author and occupational therapist Meg Fauré. She’s written countless baby books. As a Brit abroad these days, I wasn’t all that familiar. So I went into this launch with a nice, open, new mind.

The launch was in the gorgeous Broadacres Mall in northern Joburg, in BubHub. This is now my new favourite shop. They act as almost an old-fashioned community centre, with preggy belly Pilates classes and a coffee bar, and a baby clinic alongside the all-natural baby toiletries and amazing boutique buys (my favourite was Little Me – black and white, high-contrast pram toys, muslins and baby crockery). Pete and Stevie took themselves off to browse the pet shop and look at the duck pond.

I was introduced to Meg and her co author, Kath Megaw (clinical dietician). They said that this book has been the most fun the write of anything they’ve writtten before, and I can understand that completely.

Their concern is that the amount of ‘noise’ around baby feeding and weaning (in the traditional sense of weaning baby onto solids and not off milk) has taken the fun out of the whole exercise. The whole book concentrates on both parent AND baby being involved with the weaning process – no force feeding baba pureés until they literally scream for no more, but rather giving them an interesting variety of complimentary foods and putting some of the enjoyment back into eating. Because who wants to be that person who doesn’t enjoy food?

The book categorises babies and toddlers into different types of personalities, and by understanding which ‘type’ your child is, you can learn to help them eat and experience food better. For example, there’s the slow-starting baby, who needs time to understand food instead of it just being shoved in their mouth. There’s also the settled baby, who is so laid back they’ll just go with the flow.

Each section of the book is accompanied by scientific research to back it up, and recipes (with beautiful pictures, of course!) to accompany each ‘stage’ of eating. The photography and recipes are truly beautiful – I will not be waiting for baby no 2 to arrive and start solids before attempting the quinoa beef meatballs! And, as a bonus, there’s a freezer guide for each section, too! For myself, with my 3 freezers (no joke, but one is full of dog food) this is VERY handy.

This is a commercial baby book, but the general feeling is to take the business out of it, and to strip the whole experience back so parent and baby both have fun experimenting with new textures and tastes. If you only buy it just for the recipes, it’ll be so worth it.

The book Weaning Sense is available at Takealot and in select Exclusive Books stores. Meg Fauré is a renowned Occupational Therapist, and Kath Megaw is a clinical dietician and contributor to Nutripaeds. BubHub is based in Broadacres Mall, near Fourways, Johannesburg.

A little bit ‘taboo’

So here’s something only my friends know about me…

I’m still breastfeeding my toddler. Yup, you heard it right, my two-year-old still latches herself onto my (sore, swollen) nipples every night before bed. Now, she doesn’t fall asleep on there anymore (apart from last night, since she’s poorly), she just has a 5 min comfort suckle.

Why does nobody know about this, you may ask? Because it’s still, somehow, taboo.

Baby needed boobie, apparently

Just this week, I’ve had judgement. Mostly, it comes from people who are ‘concerned’ that Stevie is too old for her boobie. Well, in the words of my lovely hubby, if she was too old, she wouldn’t have it any more. These are the worst kinds of people. There is no basis to this claim, other than it makes them feel uncomfortable. I do have an issue with this – Stevie only feeds at bedtime, these days, and barely then, so who, exactly, is it offending? It’s nobody’s business how I put her to bed.

The other type of people are genuinely concerned about the safety of breastfeeding whilst pregnant. Some people, not incorrectly, are curious whether I still have milk left for her. Well the straight answer is ‘no.’ My body has been producing colostrum since 13 weeks (I travelled for a job, so had the luxury of seeing what I expressed). And it’s perfectly safe to feed whilst pregnant, as long as you have a healthy, low risk pregnancy. I have been very lucky, both times now, to carry children with ease. Long story short, if you can have sex, you can breastfeed.

Stevie’s first latch

Breastfeeding was the most wonderful child-rearing tool for me, with Stevie. It’s something just she and I have to share, it’s all ours, and I hope to have the same experience with the growing babby. It also helped me to lose all my breastfeeding weight and be back in shape by 6 months post partum.

6 months PP

I’m sharing this story because it was World Breastfeeding Week recently, and I wasn’t sure how to say what I wanted to. But here it is. I’m proudly breastfeeding a toddler while I’m pregnant. So there!

All breastfeeding information can be found on the Kelly Momand La Leche League websites.

The ‘Mumming’ Part

This is going to be a longer post than usual. Forgive me if it sounds like a vent, but I assure you it's not.

Recently, more so than usual, I have seen mums, and mums-to-be, judged and questioned for their parenting choices. People, whether they are parents, grandparents or just well-meaning non-parents, seem to want to share their opinion on how you conduct yourself during pregnancy, and how you conduct yourself and your baby during their first, well, 18 years.

Constance Hall, who has long been one of my favourite 'mum-bloggers,' has often spoken of the need for the much-spoken-of 'village' when raising children. And, for the most part, I agree with her. However, when does the village stop being helpful, and become just unhelpful, judgmental, unsolicited advice?

Every woman can read every pregnancy and parenting book under the sun, but she must decide what advice to take, what advice to throw away and what advice, quite simply, doesn't suit her. But why is it deemed okay for other people to insist on their own advice being accepted and blindly taken? I'm on a lot of Facebook mum's groups, and the people giving that advice get incredibly offended when people don't blindly take it.

But, here is my issue. I'm a self-confessed research junkie. I like to know why I'm doing things, before I do them. So why, even though you may tell me that "my kids were fine" doing such and such, must I take that advice blindly, even though it goes against every motherly grain I have?

Without this post going too much off into a tangent, I'll come to the point quicker.

Each parent or parent-to-be knows what type of person they are. No parent deliberately sets out to harm their child (well, apparently some do, but thankfully I've yet to meet that person). We do everything in our power to guide and aid our children into becoming well-rounded, pleasurable adults in the way we know possible.

Somebody, this week, voiced worry that I would be 'that' judgmental mummy, because of my own parenting styles with my own child. But why would I? I know, because trust me when I say I have had plenty of opinions on my parenting, how horrible it is to hear your own ways and decisions questioned. As long as your child is in no danger, I have no views I'm willing to share on how you raise them.

So you breastfed for 2 weeks and didn't enjoy it? Well no problem, at least you tried.
So you gave purées at 4 months? I'm sure your child has a great appetite.
So you let your child cry it out in the hope they'd sleep better? That must've been really hard for you, but I'm sure you feel better for the sleep, now.
So you are blue cheese all the way through your pregnancy? Good for you and I hope you enjoyed it, and I'm super jealous as I haven't! Please have some for me!

These are just 4 examples of parenting styles that differ from my own, but your children are not mine, and I don't know your household to comment.

I wish people, any people, would be respectful of the time, effort and overall guilt that goes into raising a child and offer just their support and well-wishes. It does take a village, but not the sometimes cruel village that seems to be occurring more and more these days.


Parenting is not a competition, and one parent's philosophy is not necessarily any better than the other's. We all need to be more aware of the trouble we are each going through, accept it and embrace each other as parents. No comparisons, no competition. Take that, Sanctimommies!

Best Kids’ Book Ever

I have to share, and I apologise if that makes me slow, that I seem to have found the best kids’ books ever! 

Ever since Stevie was born, we’ve been lucky that her personal library has grown and grown. We’ve read pretty much every book in there, but, just recently, three books seem to stand out more than others, and she requests them EVERY day.


Julia Jarman (a well-known children’s author) has teamed up with Adrian Reynolds to write a series of books about Ben and Bella, toddlers who have adventures with their every day routines. The Big Yellow Digger is an armchair, the Big Blue Train takes them to the jungle and the North Pole, and the Big Red bath goes flying.

Stevie is animal obsessed, and on every adventure they encounter different animals (her personal favourite is the bear in the party hat, and she’s also fond of Kangaroo and her baby).


Each book is written in rhyming couplets with plenty of onomatopoeic words to keep children entertained (and easier for parents to read, especially if one of them happens to be dyslexic).

If anyone ever asks, I’ll recommend these books to any parent. In the UK they’re available on Amazon for £6.99 each, and in South Africa you can find them on the Exclusive Books website for r155.